चर्चे चौके के Charche Chauke Ke

Hey! Join in the Kitchen Gossip!!

The everyday Dal

Posted by vivnidhi on December 1, 2007

Presenting…..The everyday dal

Presenting……..the everyday dal

The first thing that comes to mind when I think of arhar (toor) dal is this everyday dal recipe. I have eaten it, in at least one meal for at least 60% of the days of my life………yeah that boring…………yet so intriguingly delicious that I still make it 4 days a week. So when I read about  Jihva for Toor dal , I thought I should muster courage  to post it for a fellow Michgander.

This recipe is of my favorite basic dal. Right from childhood, we are encouraged to eat the everyday dal in a big katora ( steel bowl) so that we vegetarians get our required amount of protein. I have read a lot of recipes of arhar dal on the internet but my version is the simplest,  emphasising the taste of the dal more than anything else. Even salt and red chilli are miserly used.  The most important thing is heeng (asafoetida), that is what imparts the most distinguishable taste to it.

Recipe:

Initial tempering:
oil 1/2 tsp
cumin seeds 1/2 tsp
turmeric powder 1 tsp

Toor dal 1 cup
water 3 cups
sugar 1/2 tsp
salt to taste

Final tempering
oil (preferably ghee)  2 tsp
asafoetida 1/4 tsp
cumin seeds 1 tsp
red chilli powder 1/2 tsp

The intial tempering ingredients are added directly to the pressure cooker. Once the cumin seeds start crackling, toor dal , water, salt and our secret ingredient: sugar is added.  The dal is then pressure cooked on low-medium heat for at least 45 mins or until 4 whistles, till the dal reaches the consistency of thick pumpkin soup. If the dal is too viscous, some water may be added to achieve the consisitency mentioned. Conversely, if the dal is thin, it can be heated further in an open cooker.

The most important step is the final tempering. In a separate small pan, ghee/ oil is heated. All the ingredients except red chilli powder are added to hot ghee/oil. The chilli powder is added at the end, after the cumin seeds have crackled. The tempering is then added to the dal in the pressure cooker and the lid is closed to retain the smell of the tempering.  And voila……our everyday dal is ready to be enjoyed with roti and rice.  Top it with good “danedaar ghee” and the day is made:)

100_1044.jpg

Our daily meal: Roti, dal, vegetables and yogurt

Advertisements

7 Responses to “The everyday Dal”

  1. Dear Vivnidhi,

    I was just heading up to sleep when I looked and saw your pingback to JFI: Toor Dal. I am so happy I stayed up just a moment longer! Your lovely everyday toor dal really made my day, maybe my whole week 🙂

    I will leave another comment for step-by-step rotis soon. Meantime, thank you so much for deciding to post this!

    Best wishes,

    Linda

  2. […] Nidhi’s Everyday Dal […]

  3. […] or Split green gram without skin was always sick peoples food for me as I was growing up. I wanted arhar/toor/pigeon pea lentils on my plate every afternoon. How boring can that be. Ah, but my Mother would make all varieties of […]

  4. […] is a quick, simple one. Begin by making plain simple toor daal as detailed in my everyday daal post Arhar daal.  That is : add the initial tempering, add daal ingredients and give two whistles in a […]

  5. […] We begin as usual by making the daal or lentil soup in a pressure cooker. Heat oil and add the initial tempering. Once the cumin seeds are crackling, add the ingredients listed under daal and close the pressure cooker. Further details on making the daal can be found in my post Everyday daal. […]

  6. […] We begin as usual by making the daal or lentil soup in a pressure cooker. Heat oil and add the initial tempering. Once the cumin seeds are crackling, add the ingredients listed under daal and close the pressure cooker. Further details on making the daal can be found in my post Everyday daal. […]

  7. Arvind Chachaji said

    What you are labeling/captioning “roti” in the picture is actually a “plain or simple paratha!” from U.P./Lucknow. Rotis/Chapatis do not require any ghee/oil during the cooking process – you warm them up on the “Tawa”(griddle) until some “chikattas” (i.e brown/black spots) appear, then finish them up on an open flame or a really hot electric burner until they are puffed-up (i.e roti “phool gayee!” Just like “pooris” “phool-up” when deep frying! Of course, you can put ghee/home-made desi-makhkhan/butter on the roti when it is done before eating.)

    I remain,

    Your Arvind Chachaji ! 🙂

    P.S. Next, let’s talk about your Samosa and Chaat recipes! 🙂

    Arvind Chachaji, I have no idea who you are but I am sure that you do know how to make rotis. The words you use to describe the roti making procedure is accurate. I do not use oil while making the rotis. The oily stuff you are seeing in the picture is ghee applied to the kids rotis after it is cooked and while the roti is still warm. I have not posted any chaat or samosa recipes yet, please check out this post about how I make rotis : https://charchechaukeke.wordpress.com/2007/11/19/hello-world/

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

 
%d bloggers like this: